Job outlook Electrical Mechanic in Ontario

Job opportunities for Electrical mechanics (NOC 7333) are fair in Ontario over the next 3 years. This job outlook is also applicable to people working as an electrical mechanic.

Job opportunities in Ontario

electrical mechanic
Outlook over the next 3 years
Fair

The employment outlook will be fair for Electrical mechanics (NOC 7333) in Ontario for the 2019-2021 period.

The following factors contributed to this outlook:

  • Employment growth will lead to a moderate number of new positions.
  • A moderate number of positions will become available due to retirements.
  • There are a small number of unemployed workers with recent experience in this occupation.

Electrical mechanics work across various industries with nearly half in manufacturing and electric power generation, transmission and distribution. Other key industries of employment are commercial and industrial machinery and equipment repair and maintenance and construction.

Within the manufacturing industry, the largest number of mechanics work in electrical equipment production to produce goods such as transformers and power-related equipment, automation tools, and relays and switches. Steady manufacturing activity overall may help support the need for automation tools, apparatus, motors, and switches, particularly as companies move to more advanced manufacturing practices and upgrade production systems. Meanwhile, investments to upgrade aging infrastructure across the utilities industry and expand access and capacity to the provincial energy grid may create work for these manufacturers to supply transformers and other high voltage equipment and devices. Investments in the distribution and transmission network along with nuclear refurbishment activities will create further opportunities for mechanics in the utilities industry.

Mechanics that work in construction or that support building activity may see favourable job prospects over the forecast period. Higher levels of non-residential construction activity in Ontario led by large projects in transit, highways and bridges, and industrial facilities will maintain the need for electrical components. Though residential construction will moderate in 2019, higher population growth in some of Ontario's largest urban centres continues to drive housing developments such as condominiums.

Steady industrial activity and construction will sustain the need for repair and maintenance services to maintain various pieces of electrical equipment. Improved traction in the provincial mining industry and a few large projects in the oil and natural gas industry in western Canada may provide a boost compared to recent years, especially for generators and motors. Electric motors and parts are also finding new uses in areas like the motor vehicle industry.

There is one voluntary skilled trade associated with this occupation in Ontario– electric motor system technician. Most employers prefer candidates who have college or technical training in a related field and/or several years of practical experience. Some employers may require experience with specific equipment such as transformers, switchgears, rotors, industrial motors, generators, electric motors, coils and armatures. Knowledge of welding techniques may also be an asset. A valid driver's licence may be required to visit various locations to provide on-site customer service. Individuals may need to work various shifts and be on call for emergency repairs. Some positions may also require working at heights so completion of a working at heights training program may be required. There is some seasonality associated with this occupation with more opportunities available during the spring to summer months.

Here are some key facts about Electrical mechanics in the Ontario region:

  • Approximately 1,450 people worked in this occupation in May 2015.
  • Electrical mechanics mainly work in the following sectors:
    • Utilities (NAICS 22): 20%
    • Repair and maintenance (NAICS 811): 17%
    • Electrical equipment, appliance and component manufacturing (NAICS 335): 14%
    • Construction (NAICS 23): 12%
    • Wholesale trade (NAICS 41): 6%
  • The distribution of full-time and part-time workers in this occupation is:
    • Full-time workers: more than 95% compared to 79% for all occupations
    • Part-time workers: less than 5% compared to 21% for all occupations
  • 77% of electrical mechanics work all year, while 23% work only part of the year, compared to 63% and 37% respectively among all occupations. Those who worked only part of the year did so for an average of 33 weeks compared to 31 weeks for all occupations.
  • 5% of electrical mechanics are self-employed compared to an average of 12% for all occupations.

Breakdown by region

Explore job prospects in Ontario by economic region.

Location Job outlook
Hamilton–Niagara Peninsula Region Fair
Kingston–Pembroke Region Undetermined
Kitchener–Waterloo–Barrie Region Fair
London Region Undetermined
Muskoka–Kawarthas Region Undetermined
Northeast Region Fair
Northwest Region Undetermined
Ottawa Region Undetermined
Stratford–Bruce Peninsula Region Undetermined
Toronto Region Fair
Windsor-Sarnia Region Undetermined
Legend: The job opportunities can be: Undetermined Limited Fair Good

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