Job prospects Fertilization Service Contractor - Agriculture in Ontario

Job opportunities for Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers (NOC 8252) are fair in Ontario over the next 3 years. This job outlook is also applicable to people working as a fertilization service contractor - agriculture.

Note that the current 2019-2021 Employment Outlook was published in December 2019 based on information available at that time.

Job opportunities in Ontario

fertilization service contractor - agriculture
Outlook over the next 3 years
Fair

The employment outlook will be fair for Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers (NOC 8252) in Ontario for the 2019-2021 period.

The following factors contributed to this outlook:

  • Employment decline will lead to the loss of some positions.
  • A moderate number of positions will become available due to retirements.
  • Due to the seasonal nature of this occupation, employment opportunities tend to be more favourable during the summer months.

Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers mainly work on farms and at horse racing tracks. Most of the farms in the province are in southern Ontario. More than one-half of all farms in the province specialize in oilseed and grain farming, cattle ranching and farming, or other crop production, so employment prospects may be better in these areas.

Population growth, continued modernization of the industry, and changes to regulatory standards, may lead to opportunities in this occupation to support farming operations across Ontario. Agricultural service contractors may be required to use new equipment, such as agricultural global positioning systems and robotic machinery, to help raise output and productivity on farms. These contractors will also need to be familiar with regulatory practices on pesticide usage, crop harvesting, and livestock breeding and herding. Over the past several years, farms in Ontario have increased in size so some operations may require more than one supervisor to help oversee daily activities. Enforcement of the national Livestock Identification and Traceability program may create work in this field as well, specifically for those that specialize in livestock farming. However, an increasing shift in agricultural production away from livestock farming to crop-based production could affect the demand for livestock workers compared to those in crop-based production.

Outside of agriculture, a large number of specialized livestock workers work at horse racing tracks as horse trainers and stable forepersons. The horse racing industry has seen some setbacks over the years, but recent investments from the provincial government and improved confidence may lead to opportunities for these workers in some parts of the province.

This occupation has a high rate of self-employment in Ontario, with many agricultural service contractors operating their own business. As such, those wishing to enter this field may need to invest in farming equipment and supplies depending on the type of agricultural service offered. Demand for service contractors will be better for those with several years of agricultural experience and knowledge of new farming practices and machinery. Similarly, farm supervisors and livestock workers that specialize in a particular area of crop cultivation or livestock care may have improved job prospects.

Those that work in crop production such as a crop harvester may have to complete a Grower Pesticide Safety Course. In addition, there are two voluntary skilled trades associated with this occupation in Ontario–agricultural swine herdsperson and agricultural dairy herdsperson. Supervisors in crop production often have fewer job opportunities in the winter months while specialized livestock workers usually work year-round. Some of these positions may require candidates to work long hours, flexible shifts, and in rural and remote locations. Some positions may require a valid driver's licence as well.

Here are some key facts about Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers in the Ontario region:

  • Approximately 5,050 people work in this occupation.
  • Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers mainly work in the following sectors:
    • Agriculture (NAICS 111, 112, 1151, 1152): 57%
    • Arts, entertainment and recreation (NAICS 71): 24%
  • The distribution of full-time and part-time workers in this occupation is:
    • Full-time workers: 86% compared to 79% for all occupations
    • Part-time workers: 14% compared to 21% for all occupations
  • 71% of agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers work all year, while 29% work only part of the year, compared to 63% and 37% respectively among all occupations. Those who worked only part of the year did so for an average of 33 weeks compared to 31 weeks for all occupations.
  • 42% of agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers are self-employed compared to an average of 12% for all occupations.
  • Breakdown by region

    Explore job prospects in Ontario by economic region.

    Legend: The job opportunities can be: Undetermined Limited Fair Good

    Source Labour Market Information | Outlook Methodology

    You can also look at this data on a map. Go to LMI Explore

    Job prospects elsewhere in Canada

    We expect that the labour supply and demand for Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers (NOC 8252) will be balanced in Canada over the next 10 years.

    Learn more

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